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CONTENTS
Volume 3, Number 1, March 2016
 

Abstract
This paper describes the backgrounds, motivations and recent history of structural health monitoring (SHM) developments to various types of engineering structures. Extensive applications of SHM technologies in bridges, high-rise buildings, sport avenues, offshore platforms, underground structures, dams, etc. in mainland China are summarily categorized and listed in tables. Sensors used in implementations, their deployment, damage identification strategies if applicable, preliminary monitoring achievements and experience are presented in the lists. Finally, existing problems and promising research efforts in civil SHM are discussed, highlighting challenges and future trends.

Key Words
structural health monitoring; large-span civil infrastructure; high-rise buildings; damage identification; data normalization

Address
Hong-Nan Li, Dong-Sheng Li, Liang Ren, Ting-Hua Yi, Zi-Guang Jia and Kun-Peng LI: State Key Lab of Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Faculty of Infrastructure Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023, P.R. China


Abstract
Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been attracting numerous research efforts around the world because it targets at monitoring structural conditions and performance to prevent catastrophic failure, and to provide quantitative data for engineers and infrastructure owners to design a reliable and economical asset management strategy. In the past decade, with supports from Australian Research Council (ARC), Cooperative Research Center for Infrastructure and Engineering Asset Management (CIEAM), CSIRO and industry partners, intensive research works have been conducted in the School of Civil, Environmental and Mining Engineering, University of Western Australia and Centre for Infrastructural Monitoring and Protection, Curtin University on various techniques of SHM. The researches include the development of hardware, software and various algorithms, such as various signal processing techniques for operational modal analysis, modal analysis toolbox, non-model based methods for assessing the shear connection in composite bridges and identifying the free spanning and supports conditions of pipelines, vibration based structural damage identification and model updating approaches considering uncertainty and noise effects, structural identification under moving loads, guided wave propagation technique for detecting debonding damage, and relative displacement sensors for SHM in composite and steel truss bridges. This paper aims at summarizing and reviewing the recent research advances on SHM of civil infrastructure in Western Australia.

Key Words
research advances; structural health monitoring; review; Western Australia

Address
Jun Li and Hong Hao: Centre for Infrastructural Monitoring and Protection, School of Civil and Mechanical Engineering,
Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia


Abstract
Monitoring the performance and estimating the remaining useful life of aging civil infrastructure in the United States has been identified as a major objective in the civil engineering community. Structural health monitoring has emerged as a central tool to fulfill this objective. This paper presents a review of the major structural monitoring programs that have been recently implemented in the United States, focusing on the integrity and performance assessment of large-scale structural systems. Applications where response data from a monitoring program have been used to detect and correct structural deficiencies are highlighted. These applications include (but are not limited to): i) Post-earthquake damage assessment of buildings and bridges; ii) Monitoring of cables vibration in cable-stayed bridges; iii) Evaluation of the effectiveness of technologies for retrofit and seismic protection, such as base isolation systems; and iv) Structural damage assessment of bridges after impact loads resulting from ship collisions. These and many other applications show that a structural health monitoring program is a powerful tool for structural damage and condition assessment, that can be used as part of a comprehensive decision-making process about possible actions that can be undertaken in a large-scale civil infrastructure system after potentially damaging events.

Key Words
structural health monitoring; system identification; civil infrastructure systems; structural damage assessment

Address
Satish Nagarajaiah and Kalil Erazo: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, Houston TX 77005, USA

Abstract
The paper reports a wide overview of the scientific activities on Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) in Italy. They are classified on three different conceptual scales: national territory (macro); regional area (medium); single structure (small). In the latter case differences have been pointed out between permanent installation and short-term experimental campaigns. A particular focus has been dedicated to applications devoted to cultural heritage which have an important historic, strategic and economic value for Italy. Two specific cases, the first related to the permanent monitoring of an historical Basilica and the second regarding the dynamic testing of a modern structure, have been presented as a basis for a general discussion.

Key Words
structural health monitoring; system identification; cultural heritage; dynamics

Address
Vincenzo Gattulli and Francesco Potenza: Department of Civil Architectural and Environmental Engineering, University of L\'Aquila, Nucleo Industriale di Pile, 67100, L\'Aquila, Italy
Marco Lepidi: Department of Civil, Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Montallegro 1, 16145, Genoa, Italy



Abstract
In this paper, recent research trends and activities on structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure in Korea are reviewed. Recently, there has been increasing need for adopting smart sensing technologies to SHM, so this review focuses on smart sensing, monitoring, and assessment for civil infrastructure. Firstly, the research activities on smart sensor technology is reviewed including optical fiber sensors, piezoelectric sensors, wireless smart sensors, and vision-based sensing system. Then, a brief overview is given to the recent advances in smart monitoring and assessment techniques such as vibration-based global monitoring techniques, local monitoring with piezoelectric materials, decentralized monitoring techniques for wireless sensors, wireless power supply and energy harvest. Finally, recent joint SHM activities on several test beds in Korea are discussed to share the up-to-date information and to promote the smart sensors and monitoring technologies for applications to civil infrastructure. It includes a Korea-US joint research on test bridges of the Korea Expressway Corporation (KEC), a Korea-US-Japan joint research on Jindo cable-stayed bridge, and a comparative study for cable tension measurement techniques on Hwamyung cable-stayed bridge, and a campaign test for displacement measurement techniques on Sorok suspension bridge.

Key Words
smart sensors; structural health monitoring; damage detection; civil infrastructure

Address
Jeong-Tae Kim: Department of Ocean Engineering, Pukyong National University, Korea
Sung-Han Sim: Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, UNIST, Korea
Soojin Cho: Department of Civil Engineering, University of Seoul, Korea
Chung-Bang Yun : Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, KAIST, Korea
Jiyoung Min: Structural Engineering Research Institute, Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology, Korea


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