Techno Press
Tp_Editing System.E (TES.E)
Login Search


sss
 
CONTENTS
Volume 7, Number 3, March 2011
 

Abstract
We review the current understanding of modularity in biological motor control and its forms, and then relate this modularity to proposed modular control structures for biomimetic robots. We note the features that are different between the robotic and the biological

Key Words
motor primitives; synergies; pattern generators; stability; hierarchy; modularity; degrees of freedom.

Address
Simon F. Giszter : Neurobiology and Anatomy, Drexel University College of Medicine, USA
Corey B. Hart : Neurobiology and Anatomy, Drexel University College of Medicine, USA


Abstract
The promise of biomimetic smart structures that can function as sensors and actuators in biomedicine is enormous. Technological development in the field of stimuli-responsive shape memory polymers have opened up a new avenue of applications for polymer-based synthetic actuators. Such synthetic actuators mimic various attributes of living organisms including responsiveness to stimuli, shape memory, selectivity, motility, and organization. This article briefly reviews various stimuli-responsive shape memory polymers and their application as bioactuators. Although the technological advancements have prototyped the potential applications of these smart materials, their widespread commercialization depends on many factors such as sensitivity, versatility, moldability, robustness, and cost.

Key Words
smart hydrogels; shape memory polymers; bioactuators; surgical tools; artificial cornea; glucose sensors; artificial muscles; drug delivery.

Address
Veronica J. Neiman and Shyni Varghese : Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, California, USA

Abstract
Using computational modeling, we design a pair of biomimetic microcapsules that exploit chemical mechanisms to communicate and alter their local environment. As a result, these synthetic objects can undergo autonomous, directed motion. In the simulations, signaling microcapsules release

Key Words
computer modeling; microcapsules; artificial cells; self-propelled particles; soft active materials.

Address
German V. Kolmakov, Victor V. Yashin and Anna C. Balazs : Chemical Engineering Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA

Abstract
The native extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of an integrated fibrous protein network and proteoglycan-based ground (hydrogel) substance. We designed a novel electrospinning technique to engineer a three dimensional fiber-hydrogel composite that mimics the native ECM structure, is injectable, and has practical macroscale dimensions for clinically relevant tissue defects. In a model system of articular cartilage tissue engineering, the fiber-hydrogel composites enhanced the biological response of adult stem cells, with dynamic mechanical stimulation resulting in near native levels of extracellular matrix. This technology platform was expanded through structural and biochemical modification of the fibers including hydrophilic fibers containing chondroitin sulfate, a significant component of endogenous tissues, and hydrophobic fibers containing ECM microparticles.

Key Words
electrospin; fibers; hydrogel; cartilage; extracellular matrix; biomimetic; tissue engineering.

Address
Jeannine Coburn , Matt Gibson, Christopher Laird, Lorenzo Moroni, Jennifer Elisseeff :Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
Jeannine Coburn and Jennifer Elisseeff :Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
Pierre Alain Bandalini :Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, France
Hai-Quan Mao :Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland
Dror Seliktar :Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Technion City, Haifa, Israel

Abstract
An understanding of biomaterials

Key Words
smart material; bio-inspired design; mechanoactive materials; bone; body armor; flow directing material; multiscale structure and function; load-induced fluid flow.

Address
Melissa Louise Knothe Tate :Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, Ohio 44106, USA

Abstract
Recent developments in Smart Structures with very large scale embedded sensors and actuators have introduced new challenges in terms of data processing and sensor fusion. These smart structures are dynamically classified as a large-scale system with thousands of sensors and actuators that form the musculoskeletal of the structure, analogous to human body. In order to develop structural health monitoring and diagnostics with data provided by thousands of sensors, new sensor informatics has to be developed. The focus of our on-going research is to develop techniques and algorithms that would utilize this musculoskeletal system effectively; thus creating the intelligence for such a large-scale autonomous structure. To achieve this level of intelligence, three major research tasks are being conducted: development of a Bio-Inspired data analysis and information extraction from thousands of sensors; development of an analytical technique for Optimal Sensory System using Structural Observability; and creation of a bio-inspired decision-making and control system. This paper is focused on the results of our effort on the first task, namely development of a Neuro-Morphic Engineering approach, using a neuro-symbolic data manipulation, inspired by the understanding of human information processing architecture, for sensor fusion and structural diagnostics.

Key Words
wireless sensors; bio-inspired data analysis; sensor data fusion; neuro-symbolic network; transmission and distribution infrastructure.

Address
Rahmat A. Shoureshi, Tracy Schantz and Sun W. : LimIntelligent Systems Lab, School of Engineering & Computer Science, University of Denver,
Denver, Colorado, U.S.A


Techno-Press: Publishers of international journals and conference proceedings.       Copyright © 2017 Techno-Press
P.O. Box 33, Yuseong, Daejeon 34186 Korea, Tel: +82-42-828-7996, Fax : +82-42-828-7997, Email: info@techno-press.com