Techno Press
Tp_Editing System.E (TES.E)
Login Search


was
 
CONTENTS
Volume 17, Number 5, November 2013
 

Abstract
In this paper, the effects of parapets on the mean and fluctuating wind pressures which are acting on a flat top of a finite cylinder vertically placed on a flat plate have experimentally been investigated. The aspect ratio (AR) of cylinder is 1 and the Reynolds number (Re) based on cylinder diameter and free stream velocity is 150000. The pressure distributions on the flat top and the side wall of the finite cylinder immersed in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer have been obtained for different parapet heights. The large magnitudes of mean and minimum suction pressures occurring near the leading edge were measured for the cases with and without parapet. They shift to the further downstream on the circular top with increasing parapet height. It is seen that the parapets reduce the local high suction on the top up to 24%.

Key Words
parapet; suction pressure; flat top; finite cylinder; wind tunnel

Address
Y. Ozmen : Department of Mechanical Engineering, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon 61080, Turkey

Abstract
The vehicle-induced aerodynamic loads bring vibrations to some of the highway sound barriers, for they are designed in consideration of natural wind loads only. As references to the previous field experiment, the vehicle-induced aerodynamic loads is investigated by numerical and theoretical methodologies. The numerical results are compared to the experimental one and proved to be available. By analyzing the flow field achieved in the numerical simulation, the potential flow is proved to be the main source of both head and wake impact, so the theoretical model is also validated. The results from the two methodologies show that the shorter vehicle length would produce larger negative pressure peak as the head impact and wake impact overlapping with each other, and together with the fast speed, it would lead to a wake without vortex shedding, which makes the potential hypothesis more accurate. It also proves the expectation in vehicle-induced aerodynamic loads on Highway Sound Barriers Part1: Field Experiment, that max/min pressure is proportional to the square of vehicle speed and inverse square of separation distance.

Key Words
vehicle-induced aerodynamic loads; highway sound barriers; numerical simulation; theoretical model; potential theory

Address
Dalei Wang, Benjin Wang and Airong Chen : Department of Bridge Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092, China

Abstract
Thin, high-strength steel roof cladding is widely used in residential and industrial low-rise buildings and is susceptible to failure during severe wind storms such as cyclones. Current cladding design is heavily reliant on experimental testing for the determination of roof cladding performance. Further study is necessary to evolve current design standards, and numerical modelling of roof cladding can provide an efficient and cost effective means of studying the response of cladding in great detail. This paper details the development of a numerical model that can simulate the static response of corrugated roof cladding. Finite element analysis (FEA) was utilised to determine the response of corrugated cladding subject to a static wind pressure, which included the anisotropic material properties and strain-hardening characteristics of the thin steel roof cladding. The model was then validated by comparing the numerical data with corresponding experimental test results. Based on this comparison, the model was found to successfully predict the fastener reaction, deflection and the characteristics in deformed shape of the cladding. The validated numerical model was then used to predict the response of the cladding subject to a design cyclone pressure trace, excluding fatigue effects, to demonstrate the potential of the model to investigate more complicated loading circumstances.

Key Words
finite element analysis; corrugated steel roof cladding; wind loading; testing; validation

Address
Amy C. Lovisa, Vincent Z. Wang, and John D. Ginger : School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
David J. Henderson : Cyclone Testing Station, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia

Abstract
The present study aims to investigate characteristics of the flow structures around the Ahmed body by using both experimental and numerical methods. Therefore, 1/4 scale Ahmed body having 25o slant angle was employed. The Reynolds number based on the body height, H and the free stream velocity, U was ReH=1.48x104. Investigations were conducted in two parts. In the first part of the study, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method was used to resolve the flow structures around the Ahmed body, numerically. In the second part of the study the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was used to measure instantaneous velocity fields around the Ahmed body. Time-averaged and instantaneous velocity vectors maps, streamline topology and vorticity contours of the flow fields were presented and discussed in details. Comparison of the mean and turbulent quantities of the LES results and the PIV results with the results of Lienhart et al. (2000) at different locations over the slanted surface and in the wake region of the Ahmed body were also given. Flow features such as critical points and recirculation zones in the wake region downstream of the Ahmed body were well captured. The spectra of numerically and experimentally obtained stream-wise and vertical velocity fluctuations were presented and they show good consistency with the numerical result of Minguez et al. (2008).

Key Words
Ahmed body; bluff body; flow separation; LES; PIV

Address
Tural Tunay, Besir Sahin and Huseyin Akilli : Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330, Adana, Turkey

Abstract
Wind tunnel experiments were performed to study the wind loads on an inclined flat plate with and without a guide plate. Highly turbulent flow, which corresponded to free-stream turbulence intensity on the flat roof of low-rise buildings, was produced by a turbulence generation grid at the inlet of the test section. The test model could represent a typical solar collector panel of a solar water heater. There are up-stream movements of the separation bubble and side-edge vortices, more intense fluctuating pressure and a higher bending moment in the turbulent flow. A guide plate would result in higher lift coefficient, particularly with an increased projected area ratio of a guide plate to an inclined flat plate. The value of lift coefficient is considerably lower with increased free-stream turbulent intensity.

Key Words
solar collector; inclined flat plate; turbulence intensity; guide plate; wind loads

Address
Kung-Ming Chung : Aerospace Science and Technology Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
Chin-Cheng Chou, Keh-Chin Chang and Yi-Jun Chen: 2Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan

Abstract
By using the nonlinear aerostatic stability theory together with the method of mean wind decomposition, a method for nonlinear aerostatic stability analysis is proposed for long-span suspension bridges under yaw wind. A corresponding program is developed considering static wind load nonlinearity and structural nonlinearity. Taking a suspension bridge with three towers and double main spans as an example, the full range aerostatic instability is analyzed under wind at different attack angles and yaw angles. The results indicate that the lowest critical wind speed of aerostatic instability is gained when the initial yaw angle is greater than 0o, which suggests that perhaps yaw wind poses a disadvantage to the aerostatic stability of a long span suspension bridge. The results also show that the main span in upstream goes into instability first, and the reason for this phenomenon is discussed.

Key Words
yaw wind; suspension bridge; aerostatic stability; nonlinearity

Address
Wen-Ming Zhang : School of Civil Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210096, China
Yao-Jun Ge : State Key Laboratory for Disaster Reduction in Civil Engineering, Department of Bridge Engineering,
Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China
Marc L. Levitan: Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,
LA 70803,United


Techno-Press: Publishers of international journals and conference proceedings.       Copyright © 2017 Techno-Press
P.O. Box 33, Yuseong, Daejeon 34186 Korea, Tel: +82-42-828-7996, Fax : +82-42-828-7997, Email: info@techno-press.com